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Buenos Aires: City of Tango and unoriginality?

When you mention the Argentinian city of Buenos Aires, most people think of the seductive dance of Tango.


Tango dancers giving a show on a street corner in Buenos Aires
Tango dancers in Buenos Aires, Argentina

And rightfully so:

There are plenty of “supper clubs” doing the dinner and dance thing where you can watch professional dancers while having a 3-course dinner. Other places, are like clubs where amateurs can practice their dancing in a fun way, creating a large community of tango dancers.


On Florida Road, the main shopping street in the city centre, professional dancers give a street performance every day, and in St Telmo Square, there are often performances at night, or dancers practicing their skills to live music. And everyone is welcome.

There are plenty of dance schools that offer Tango classes to locals and foreigners alike..


A bit of history regarding the Tango:

The dance was influenced by the Candombe ceremonies of former slaves and originated in the lower-class districts of Buenos Aires and Montevideo, Uruguay. It was a favourite of European immigrants, former slaves, working and lower class people. It became popular in Europe after wealthier Argentines travelled to Europe and performed the dance there. Different styles of the dance then evolved, and the dance was performed by the wealthier upper-class Argentines.


In the 1930’s the dance began to decline due to the overthrow of the Hipolito Yrigoyen government and the great depression. Under the government of Juan Peron, the dance became popular again.


In the 1950’s the then popular dance was banned again, and male-only dancers, as was the custom at the time, used to practice for 3 years before their debut in public. Practice was considered a public gathering that was banned under the military dictatorship at the time. Finally, in the 1980’s it became popular once again, due to a show in Paris, Tango Argentino, the Broadway musical Forever Tango and Tango Passion in Europe [1].


But besides Tango, what else does this city have to offer?

Honestly speaking, for us it is just another modern city. Especially the city centre has all the fancy stores that you can find in any other modern city. Nothing special about it.

At the port, there are also a few nice restaurants where you can eat and watch the water. It is also a financial hub with high-rise office buildings and a park where locals gather for picnics, birthday parties and Furry gatherings apparently.


If you venture outside the center to Montserrat and St Telmo though, things get more interesting:

Cobbled streets are lined with cute little shops, bars and café’s to relax with your croissant and espresso.